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Analizing Texts using a Vocabulary Profiler


girl with a laptop sitting on newspapers

 What’s a vocabulary profiler?

A vocabulary profiler is a tool that checks if a piece of text contains words from a vocabulary list.

Why should I use a vocabulary profiler?

Teachers use vocabulary profilers to check the vocabulary level of a reading text they use for a class or for an assessment. It can be useful for identifying the level of a reading text or as a way of knowing which words in a text should receive more focus. Students can use it to see which words might be most useful for them to learn.

Analizing texts  using a Vocab Profiler

I choose a topic , a website where I could possibly find the information  and  article of my choice

Once I have found it , I copy the article and paste it in the vocab profiler and The Vocab Profiler classifies the vocabulary in four categories

  • K1 Words
  • K2 Words
  • AWL Words
  • Off-List Words

Vocab profiler 101

The site also highlights the words in colors to make  it easy  for you to focus in one of the each categories .

Analyzing a text with Vocab Kitchen

Vocab Kitchen

Vocab Kitchen is a user-friendly vocabulary profiler that will help you know with accuracy the level of the text you desire to use. the option for this vocabulary profiler that I am in more interested in is the one that uses the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages  as a base.

CEFR_Levels_EN1

What can I do with  the texts after analyzed?

You can do any of these five type of exercises

  • Multiple Choice Exercise
  • Cloze test
  • Matching
  • True or False
  • Short Answer

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Writing Formal and Informal Emails


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Objective:

Writing emails in order to ask and give information about family and friends

Writing emails in order to ask and give basic information about different institutions, tasks and responsibilities.


Vocabulary

  • Reply
  • Reply to all
  • Delete
  • Forward
  • Email Address
  • From
  • To
  • C.C (Carbon Copy)
  • BCC (Blind Carbon Copy)
  • Subject
  • Attachment
  • Send
  • Open
  • Links
  • Address Book
  • Domain Name
  • Compose
  • Write
  • Inbox
  • Draft
  • Contacts
  • Recipient
  • Senders
  • Subject
  • Folders

 Key Phrases

Starting and Finishing Emails

Formal and Informal

More expressions for writing emails available here 


Schema Activation

Students start the class by discussing this issue

“You are overwhelmed with work”

 


Pre-Task

  1. Students watch the video “Talking about Email” and note down important phrases that might be useful for a later task
  2. Students watch the video Email “DOs and DON’Ts”and note the parts of an email
  3. Student watch about abour “Greetings and Closings” and note down the ones that can be useful to them
  4. Students are going to read the informal email and answer questions about them. They also pay attention to the structure of an informal email
  5. Students answer a kahoot quiz to review key phrases and vocabulary.

Task

Students are gonna write a formal and Informal Emails


Post-Task

Students  are going to answer a quiz with questions related to formal and informal emails


 

Negotiation in Different Contexts


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Vocabulary

Stating an opinion

  • In my opinion…
  • The way I see it…
  • If you want my honest opinion….
  • According to Lisa…
  • As far as I’m concerned…
  • If you ask me…

Asking for an opinon

  • What’s your idea?
  • What are your thoughts on …..?
  • How do you feel about that?
  • Do you have anything to say about this?
  • What do you think?
  • Do you agree?

Expressing agreement

  • I agree with you 100 percent.
  • I couldn’t agree with more.
  • That’s so true..
  • You’re absolutely right.
  • Absolutely.
  • That’s exactly how I feel.
  • Exactly.
  • I’m afraid I agree with James.
  • You have a point there.
  • I was just going to say that.

 Expressing disagreement

  • I don’t think so.
  • (strong) No way.
  • I’m afraid I disagree.
  • (strong) I totally disagree.
  • I beg to differ.
  • Not necessarily.
  • That’s not always true.
  • That’s not always the case.
  •  I’m not so sure about that.

Pre-Task

  1. Students review vocabulary to agree and disagree with something using a quizlet set.
  2. Students are given a set of sentences and they have to tell to their classmates if they disagree with them or not.
    1. People must retire at the age of 65.
    2. People should be allowed to drive when they are 15.
    3. People should work  a maximum of 40 hours a week.
    4. Maternity leaves should last 6 months and not three.
    5. People should have at least 21 days of vacations a year.
  3. Students listen about some employees discussing about a company retreat, students listen and complete the sentences.
  4. Students practice the conversation in pairs.
  5. Student create a similar conversation using the previous model as a base.

Main Task

  1. Students create a conversation about an office that they wish to rent for their business in Liberia.

Post-Task

  1. students  complete a exercise in which they hear a statement and they reply using some of the vocabulary studied here