Transitive Verbs


Transitive verbsA transitive verb is followed by a noun or noun phrase. These noun phrases are not called predicate nouns but are instead called direct objects because they refer to the object that is being acted upon. For example: “My friend read the newspaper.” “The teenager earned a speeding ticket.”

A way to identify a transitive verb is to invert the sentence, making it passive. For example: “The newspaper was read by my friend.” “A speeding ticket was earned by the teenager.”

Two-place transitive: Vg verbs

Vg verbs (named after the verb give) precede either two noun phrases or a noun phrase and then a prepositional phrase often led by to or for. For example:  “The players gave high fives to their teammates.”

When two noun phrases follow a transitive verb, the first is an indirect object, that which is receiving something, and the second is a direct object, that being acted upon. Indirect objects can be noun phrases or prepositional phrases.

Two-place transitive: Vc verbs

Vc verbs (named after the verb consider) are followed by a noun phrase that serves as a direct object and then a second noun phrase, adjective, or infinitive phrase. The second element (noun phrase, adjective, or infinitive) is called a complement, which completes a clause that would not otherwise have the same meaning. For example: “The young couple considers the neighbors wealthy people.” “Some students perceive adults quite inaccurately.” “Sarah deemed her project to be the hardest she has ever completed.”

Related Articles

Transitive and Intransitive verbs on  K12reader.com

Direct and Indirect objects on germanna.edu

List of  common  transitive verbs on web2.uvcs.uvic.ca

Transitive and intransitive verbs on bbc.co.uk

Types of  verbs on uvu.edu

Six basic patterns built on verb types on factoryschool.com

 

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